Scars

What are Scars?

The formation of scar tissue occurs as the skin tissue heals after the skin has endured some sort of trauma. Once the skin has sustained a wound, it starts to form scar tissue. This process increases the collagen to the wound, which accelerates the healing process. The production of the collagen repairs the skin, but in some cases it can overproduce and create scars. These hypertrophic scars or keloids are raised from the skin. Other scars that may form are called atrophic scars. These are more like depressions in the skin, as they are sunken due to damaged collagen.

Hypertrophic scars develop from lasers, cuts, deep abrasions, burns and even acne. There are some instances, too, when scar tissue can form from extremely high concentrations of chemical peels and dermabrasion procedures. This can be rare, but the skin can blister. This, too, can cause scarring.

Excessive amounts of collagen are sent to the wound for tissue repair. The scar tissue that forms, which can be pink, is raised slightly from the epidermis. In some instances, the scar tissue can be itchy, painful and even get irritated.

Hypertrophic scar tissue, which normally doesn’t exceed beyond the infliction of the wound, will usually smooth over and heal within a year. There are instances, though, when the dermis is so damaged, the scar tissue may need some help in healing. In this case, topical treatments are usually prescribed. They help deal with the overabundance of collagen by breaking down the tissue, making it smooth and the scar less noticeable.

Hypertrophic scars, however, shouldn’t be confused with keloid scarring.

Keloid scars, a sort of benign tumor that form from a wound in the skin, may appear as an overabundance of collagen production creates fibrous nodules. Keloid scars, which expand from the boundaries of the initial wound, can be large, painful and rubbery. Hereditary and ethnic backgrounds are common triggers for the formation of the excessive collagen that creates keloid scars. Treatment occurs under the supervision of a doctor, whether topically or with invasive procedures to have the excessive tissue removed. Keloid scar tissue is rarely treated in esthetics, as it’s a condition that needs to be monitored. Instead, treatment is done by a dermatologist.

Atrophic scars occur through such skin concerns as acne, including cystic acne. This type of scar forms a depression in the skin because of the damage to the collagen. Atrophic scarring, which can look like pitted holes in the skin, results from the destruction of the skin tissue’s lower layers. Because there’s significant injury to the collagen fibers, it’s far more difficult for the tissue to repair and remold. This is what creates a crater.

Atrophic scars are very common from chicken pox and external injuries to the skin tissue. Treatment can range from chemical peels, microdermabrasion, collagen injection and topical prescriptions of steroids and Retin-A. At-home professional products are usually designed to complement an at-home regimen to help facilitate the smoothing of the skin texture and boost collagen production to ultimately eliminate the scar.

Post-inflammatory scarring, or PIH, is a very common formation after acne lesions have healed. This condition often leaves a discoloration or mark on the skin. It’s scar tissue, but it differs from the overproduction or underproduction of collagen. It’s more of a condition where the melanin leaves deposits in the skin and needs to be lightened.

Formations of scar tissue can differ, as will the reasons behind what causes each type of scar tissue to form. Any injury caused to the dermis and epidermis will damage skin tissue. How the skin responds and the scar forms depend on the type of treatment. A more in-depth look at scarring and the cosmetic procedures used in the treatment of scars will be more throughly evaluated.

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